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Geelong’s southern link gets green light
Geelong’s southern link gets green light

Stage 1 of the major strategic cycling corridor through Geelong’s southern suburbs is expected to start construction soon following a series of prolonged delays.

First endorsed in 2014, the corridor will be a major enhancement of Geelong’s currently limited bike network.

The southern link connects central Geelong to Warn Ponds through Belmont.

It connects to Deakin University, the Bellarine Rail Trail and Barwon River Trail.

It is one of two major bike corridors in Geelong to receive substantial funding from the TAC.

The once car-crazy city now has a goal of 50% of journeys to work by public transport, walking or cycling by 2047.

Stage one connects central Geelong to Barwon River, and Stage two will connect the Barwon River to Waurn Ponds.

The 2.5km stage one was previously approved by the City of Geelong and had gone through the tender process, but just as the contract was about to be signed, councillors intervened again, requesting further tinkering with the designs.

The link has been designed so that it is separated from traffic in a bi-directional, on one side of the street configuration, achievable because of the lack of driveway along Kardinia Park in Moorabool Street.

At the request of a service station operator, and supported by local bike group, Bike Safe, a 90-metre section of the route will now be located on the footpath.

The City’s deputy mayor Trent Sullivan expressed concern about the number of cars crossing the path at the entry to the service station.

“Having carefully considered the design options, councillors have voted to move the bi-directional path for this section off the road and onto the footpath,” he said.

“This brings riders into a clearer line of sight for vehicles entering and exiting the service station.”

The contract was awarded to Enoch Civil, with work to start in August.

The council will review the performance of the shared footpath after the first 12 months in operation.

This article was made possible by the support of Bicycle Network's members who enable us to make bike riding better in Australia.